• JOHN H.F. KING

    CHARTERED CERTIFIED ACCOUNTANTS

    We are a small firm specialising in giving advice to small to medium sized owner managed businesses.

    We aim to ensure that all clients receive a friendly personalised service relevant to their needs.

    CONTACT 
Personal Tax <br> Business Tax<br/> Payroll<br /> VAT
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Business Tax
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VAT

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The History of John H.F. King
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The History of John H.F. King

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Accounts<br /> Bookkeeping <br />Management Accounts
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Management Accounts

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Business Acquisitions<br />Research & Development<br />Business Planning
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Business Acquisitions
Research & Development
Business Planning

ACCOUNTS
Accounts preparation for sole traders, partnerships and Limited Companies.
BOOKKEEPING
We can offer in house bookkeeping facilities tailored to meet your needs.
MANAGEMENT ACCOUNTS
Monthly, quarterly accounts prepared to help you maintain control over your business and to plan and prepare for the future.

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07-08-2018
32.5% Corporation Tax on overdrawn directors’ loans

HMRC defines a director's loan as money taken from your company (by you or other close family members) that isn’t:

  • a salary, dividend or expense repayment and
  • money you’ve previously paid into or loaned the company

An overdrawn director's loan account is created when a director effectively 'borrows' company money. A record of these loans must be kept in a director's loan account (DLA). Small business owners need to be mindful that withdrawing funds from their company can have unwanted tax consequences for both the company and the director. The tax rules are further complicated if the value of the loan exceeds £10,000.

Where certain DLA's are not paid off within nine months and one day of the company's year-end there is an additional Corporation Tax (CT) bill of 32.5% of the outstanding amount (prior to April 2016 this rate was 25%). In most cases this is not a permanent loss of revenue for the company as a claim can be made to have this CT refunded (but not interest) when the loan is paid back to the company. It is important to ensure that the claim to have the CT refunded is made within 4 years after the end of the year in which the participator's loan was repaid.

Planning note

The use of DLA’s as a means of extracting money from your company needs to be carefully considered with proper analysis of the tax impact for both the company and director. Please call if you need more information on this topic.

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07-08-2018
Tax free health benefits

There is no requirement for employers to pay tax and National Insurance on certain health benefits covered by tax concessions or exemptions. For example, there is no requirement to report employees’ medical or dental treatment or insurance if they are a part of a salary sacrifice arrangement. 

In addition, the following health benefits can be provided tax free:

  • A maximum of one health-screening assessment and one medical check-up in any year.
  • Eye tests required by health and safety legislation for employees who use a computer monitor or other type of screen.
  • Glasses or contact lenses required by employees for working on computer monitors or other types of screen.
  • Medical treatment for employees working overseas. The employer must have committed in advance to pay for this treatment or must pay the provider directly for the employee’s treatment or insurance.
  • Medical treatment or insurance related to injuries or diseases that result from your employee’s work.
  • Medical treatment to help an employee return to work. This allows the employer to pay up to £500 in costs for an employee to return to work.

Planning note

Any medical or dental treatment or insurance provided that is not exempt must be reported to HMRC. Employers may be required to deduct and pay tax and National Insurance on these amounts.

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07-08-2018
Gifting share in home

Most gifts made during a person's life are not subject to tax at the time of the gift. These lifetime transfers are known as 'potentially exempt transfers' or 'PETs'. The gifts or transfers achieve their potential of becoming exempt from Inheritance Tax if the taxpayer survives for more than seven years after making the gift. There is a tapered relief available if the donor dies between three and seven years after the gift is made.

The rules are different if the person making the gift retains some 'enjoyment' of the gift made. This is usually the case where the donor does not want to give up control over the assets concerned. These gifts fall under the heading of 'Gifts With Reservation of Benefits rules' or 'GWROBs'. A common example is where an elderly person gifts their home to their children (who usually live elsewhere) and continues to live in the house rent-free.

There is an interesting exception to the GWROBs rules that occurs when there is a gift of an 'undivided shares of land'. This can happen when for example an adult child moves in with a parent and the parent transfers the home into joint ownership (usually a 50:50 split). Where the two people jointly occupy the property and share the outgoings then HMRC will accept that this is not a GWROB. However, the relief is not straightforward and HMRC will carefully examine such arrangements to ensure that they meet the necessary requirements for relief.

Planning note

If you are contemplating any of the arrangements set out in this post please call to clarify that no adverse tax consequences will occur as a result.

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